Seebs
Interestingly, "spastic" is really considered an Unacceptable word where I grew up in the UK, and when I heard how much they use it in American parlance, I just assumed that it held less weight there/hadn't been as overused by bigots.
Anonymous

I think it’s just that for the most part, the people using it aren’t aware of the relationship to things like cerebral palsy. So it’s not a slur derived from a medical condition, it’s just a generic insult.

It’s sort of like “idiot”; yes, actually, there’s a historical sense which is part of some stuff that many people find offensive, but it’s been long enough that no one actually uses “idiot” or “moron” as words with a precise technical meaning that could be considered highly offensive, they’re just insults for people who are being stupid.

I also got in some trouble when I toured the Tower of London when I was about 8-10 or so, and wanted to see “the bloody tower”. Turns out it’s not called that. In my teens, I also learned that Monty Python is not a good way to learn idiomatic and inoffensive UK English.

"If I could walk that way, I wouldn’t need aftershave."

sptrashcan:

kgschmidt:

cumberpatchmannor:
Hey, Ian.

I perceive what was wrought herein.

sptrashcan:

kgschmidt:

cumberpatchmannor:

Hey, Ian.

I perceive what was wrought herein.

As a synonym for isomisogyny, may I suggest "I-can't-believe-it's-not-misogyny!" ?
Anonymous

jumpingjacktrash:

the-real-seebs:

I like it.

Only-tangentially-related: I made a joke once about:

a thin brown liquid, marketed under the trade name “I sure hope that’s not butter!”

At one point, due to events, it became desireable for me to make up a large selection of these, and put them in a video game. Some of them (like “roadsign yellow extreme butter substitute”) are mostly irrelevant, but you end up using a couple of them.

iirc, my contribution was “definitely some kind of lipid.”

Yes.

The full list:

More Buttery Than Not
Are You Tired Of Choosing Between Guns And Butter
If That’s Butter, Then I’m Richard Nixon
Definitely Some Sort Of Lipid
It Goes On Toast, Anyway
Roadsign Yellow Extreme Butter Substitute
Butter My Ass!
You Could Convince Me That’s Not Butter
I Am Starting To Suspect That’s Not Butter
It Seems Probable That’s Not Butter
I Would Bet Money That’s Not Butter
Does That Look Like Butter To You?
I Sure Hope That’s Not Butter
Dear God, Don’t Let That Be Butter
That’s Too Thick To Be Butter!
That Looks More Like Hot Air Balloon Fuel Than Butter

The guns-and-butter one was “a fine black powder which spreads easily on toast”. They tended to have funny responses if you tried to smell or taste them. “Dear God, Don’t Let That Be Butter” was “a thick black substance which moves under its own power”. It had the special trait that any attempt to interact with it in normal ways would usually just produce “No.” but occasionally would say “You really have a death wish, don’t you?” You could also listen to it: “It whispers dark concepts in a language that bypasses your conscious mind entirely. Thoughts of death fill your head.”

The ones you actually needed were That Looks More Like Hot Air Balloon Fuel Than Butter (yes, there was a hot air balloon), and That’s Too Thick To Be Butter, a “thick, gritty, grey substance” which you used to repair a brick wall.

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

Yeah. I’ve seen complaints that obviously he must have known that because everyone does, but that’s not true at all. It’s regional. Where I grew up, it’s a generic insult for physical incompetence, like “klutz”. There’s a post about this on language log. Apparently, there are also places where it’s a neutral medical term. But there’s lots of people in the US who are generally at least somewhat alert to “offensive” language, but who wouldn’t have known this was something people took offense to. I remember thinking “hmm, I wonder whether that’s offensive now” when I heard the song, but I didn’t actually know of an environment where it was generally seen that way.

the-last-teabender:

Robin Thicke is unapologetic about how rapey ‘Blurred Lines’ is, meanwhile the dude who parodied it issues a public apology for one word.

Yeah. I’ve seen complaints that obviously he must have known that because everyone does, but that’s not true at all. It’s regional. Where I grew up, it’s a generic insult for physical incompetence, like “klutz”. There’s a post about this on language log. Apparently, there are also places where it’s a neutral medical term. But there’s lots of people in the US who are generally at least somewhat alert to “offensive” language, but who wouldn’t have known this was something people took offense to. I remember thinking “hmm, I wonder whether that’s offensive now” when I heard the song, but I didn’t actually know of an environment where it was generally seen that way.

lifeblender:

Epic Novel Anon explains a number of things quite nicely.

the-real-seebs:

(Paragraphs are my own modification, because tumblr won’t let you do anything in an ask.)

I saw a post passed around a while ago which I did some thinking about, and I think it’s relevant to the discussion going on right now. The post’s contents was basically “there’s no…

I believe that power is somewhat fluid and contextual. If you accept that, and you accept the definition that privilege requires power, then privilege is also fluid and contextual.

Yeah. I tend not to really notice the kinds of power which rely on peer pressure, since I don’t experience it, but if you look at some of the problems some of the teens are having, a lot of it has to do with the fact that they can be hurt by having people say that a group they’re in is worthless or bad. Especially if those people are better at using half-baked pseudo-academic language to justify it.

roachpatrol:

i know i’ve said i don’t believe in magic but if anyone out there does and wants to slaughter a goat for me so that i get the apartment i really want, that’d be great, thank you

We seem to be fresh out of goats, but I’ll see if I can find anything.

Epic Novel Anon explains a number of things quite nicely.

(Paragraphs are my own modification, because tumblr won’t let you do anything in an ask.)

I saw a post passed around a while ago which I did some thinking about, and I think it’s relevant to the discussion going on right now. The post’s contents was basically “there’s no such thing as reverse oppression, oppression is based on having more social power”.

And I thought of a situation, which is: Say you’ve got a group of mostly-gay people that wants to support queer people. And some of the people they want to support are bisexual. And some of the people in this group say, hang on, why do you need our support? You can pass for straight, so you’re more privileged than us already, and they decide not to support any bisexual people, and members of the group generally view bisexuals as pretending, or jumping on a trend, or having a brief fling with someone of the same sex to get to claim they’re oppressed. And the bisexual people affected say, hang on, that’s a huge fucking jerk move, but their complaints are dismissed as whining. So that would be a situation where certain people get terrible treatment, because they’re getting excluded and erased from a group which should be supporting them, but in the case of “no one who is less privileged than someone can indulge in oppressive behavior towards them” it’s all okay because bisexual people can seem straight sometimes. (and, presumably, have drinks thrown on them.)

Which brings up two things: 1) Tumblr’s “no one who is less privileged can hurt someone who is more privileged” gets severely shitty once you try to apply it in real life, and 2) This also kinda highlights a huge flaw in a lot of the base assumptions made by referring to specific groups of privileged people as The Bads: It’s all well and good when you’re imagining the gilted oppressor on his ivory tower, mercilessly crushing the helpless and defenseless, but the lines get HELLA FUZZY and, unlike most visibility tests, never more so than when you’re trying to compare them. If I’ve got social anxiety and he’s gay, but most of my family is introverted enough not to care, but most of his friends don’t think it’s a big deal either and his entertainment preference is nature documentaries so he doesn’t get bugged by unwanted gay stereotypes a lot but I have to make phone calls sometimes which make me useless for the rest of the day but his aunt’s REALLY traditional so all his Christmases are terrible… then who’s got it worse?

Comparing pain doesn’t often work, and certainly not if you’re thinking “he’s got broken ribs but I’ve got a heart injury so it’s okay if I punch him again.” Best seems to be just trying to treat everyone okay, saves you the trouble of comparing suffering resumes. This got much longer than I thought it would, sorry about that.

This is some fine analysis. I was actually thinking of writing a post along these lines but I sort of feel like it’s now been done, probably better than I’d have done it.

You could maybe make a case that the harm done isn’t exactly “oppression”, but it turns out not to matter.

Mostly, it comes down to: People like to hit back. They will make excuses for this so they don’t have to feel bad about enjoying hitting people.

Do you have any tips on roleplaying an autistic character? It feels kinda silly to ask since I read a lot of autistic peoples' blogs and am autistic myself, so it feels like I oughta know how it'd play into her personality, but that might be part of the problem--knowing there's a large amount of variance in traits that makes it feel weird to have only a select few play a part for her. Idk, like I'm choosing them as the most definitive or something.
Anonymous

My arbitrary advice: Pick one that you think you can figure out how to play, but which isn’t how you are, and grab the rest from your own pool, and run with it. You can always attach a disclaimer about “not representative”.

discrimination against teenagers (ageism or adultism) /does/ exist. it's just that not listening to people who have no experience (which applies to adults too) isn't what that is. the system can actually get pretty stupid: a sixteen-year-old mother in the US has the right to make medical decisions, including life-or-death ones, for her child or children, but her legal guardian has to sign off on care for her. the UK minimum wage for teenagers is ~60% of the minimum wage for adults. (1/2)
Anonymous
(2/2) teenagers are treated like children, and most attempts at taking on responsibility by teens does not result in the expansion of rights—so why bother? a behavior that isn’t rewarded, or is actively discouraged, will not persist for long. (teenagers /do/ often have more experience than they’re given credit for—i sure knew a truckload about the mental health system by the time i was 16. but that’s kind of beside the point.)
Yeah. The rules for such things are often… I’d say contradictory at best.
"Blarghaghrgk," Anon said, in a style that may have been suitably novel but insufficiently epic. "I'll try to re-send, hold on."
Anonymous

Success! And now I just need to spend an hour or so wrestling with tumblr.